The 2000’s

 

  • 2000: TSN broadcasts a one-hour special on the 2000 Tim Hortons Canadian Ringette Championships from Prince George, British Columbia.
  • 2000: The fifth World Ringette Championship is held in Helsinki, Finland. Finland wins the gold medal and Canada takes silver.
  • 2001: TSN broadcasts a one-hour special on the 2001 Tim Hortons Canadian Ringette Championships from Moncton, New Brunswick.
  • 2001: Ringette Canada begins transition to Competency Based Education Training (CBET) for coaches (August).
  • 2002: 30-second shot clock rules come into effect for the junior, belle and open divisions.
  • 2002: Participant Development Model (PDM) and Coach Development Model (CDM) produced and approved by Ringette Canada’s Board of Directors in January.
  • 2002: Community Sport – Initiation (CSI) workshop developed in May. CSI workshops are piloted in Calgary, Alberta in June and Halifax, Nova Scotia in July.
  • 2002: Ringette Canada presents their CSI workshop model at the Coaching Association of Canada’s Partner Days in September.
  • 2002: Agnes Jacks is inducted as a Member of the Order of Canada on October 26, 2002 in Halifax, Nova Scotia.
  • 2002: First Leadership Retreat for High-Performance Women Coaches takes place in October.
  • 2002: Canada hosts the sixth World Ringette Championship in Edmonton, Alberta. Canada reclaims the world title after posting a 3-1 win over Finland. A sell-out crowd of 3850 attends the final game, which was also televised live on CBC Sports to 144,000 viewers.
  • 2003: Ringette is part of the Canada Winter Games in Bathurst/Campbellton, New Brunswick. Ontario wins gold, Manitoba takes home silver and British Columbia claims bronze.
  • 2003: The 2003 Canadian Ringette Championships are held in Waterloo, Ontario.
  • 2003: Facilitator training for CSI workshop takes place in Waterloo, Ontario in April.
  • 2003: The 40th anniversary of ringette is celebrated throughout Canada.
  • 2003: In September, the CSI workshop is launched across Canada and the first pilot of integrated CSI workshop for ringette and Special Olympics floor hockey coaches.
  • 2003: 2nd annual Leadership Retreat for High-Performance Women Coaches (October).
  • 2004: The 2004 Canadian Ringette Championships are held in Calgary, Alberta.
  • 2004: The National Ringette League is launched (November), which features Canada’s elite athletes participating on 17 teams in three divisions across the country (Western – eight teams, Ontario – four teams and Quebec – five teams).
  • 2004: Sweden hosts the seventh World Ringette Championship in Stockholm. Finland reclaims the world title after defeating Canada 9-3.
  • 2005:   The first edition of the Ringette eReview is posted on the Ringette Canada website. The online publication replaces the former Ringette Review (a print publication) and is published every two months during the ringette season.
  • 2005: The 2005 Canadian Ringette Championships are held in Winnipeg, Manitoba from April 11-16.
  • 2005: The National Ringette League enters its second season with 19 teams participating in four divisions across the country (Western – five teams, Central – five teams, Ontario – five teams and Quebec – four teams). The inaugural NRL championship game was held in Montreal, Quebec on April 1, 2006 and the Cambridge Turbos came away with the win.
  • 2006: The 2006 Tim Hortons Canadian Ringette Championships are held in Longueuil, Quebec from April 3-8.
  • 2006: The National Ringette League enters its third season with 16 teams participating in three divisions across the country (Western – seven teams, Ontario – five teams and Quebec – four teams). The NRL championship game is held Halifax, Nova Scotia on April 10, 2007, with Edmonton WAM! claiming the league title.
  • 2007: Ringette is part of the Canada Winter Games in Whitehorse, NWT. Ontario wins gold, Alberta takes home silver and Quebec claims bronze.
  • 2007: The 2007 Tim Hortons Canadian Ringette Championships are held in Halifax, Nova Scotia from April 9-14.
  • 2007: The National Ringette League enters its fourth season with 17 teams playing in two Conferences across Canada – a Western Conference with seven teams and an Eastern Conference with ten teams. An NRL Championship tournament replaced the Open division at the Canadian Ringette Championships and the Cambridge Turbos won the league title.
  • 2007: Canada hosts the eighth World Ringette Championship in Ottawa, Ontario. Finland holds onto the world title after defeating Canada 5-4 in overtime.
  • 2008: The 2008 Tim Hortons Canadian Ringette Championships are held in St. Albert, Alberta from March 31 – April 5.
  • 2008: The National Ringette League enters its fifth season with 18 teams playing in two Conferences across Canada – a Western Conference with six teams and an Eastern Conference with twelve teams. The NRL championship tournament is held in Charlottetown, PEI, with the Cambridge Turbos winning the league title.
  • 2008: The first ever World Club Ringette Championship is held in Sault Ste Marie, Ontario from November 5-8. Four teams from Canada’s National Ringette League participated, along with the top two club teams from Finland. The Cambridge Turbos captured the world club title after defeating the Finnish team, LuKi-82, Luvia.
  • 2009: Ringette is featured on the CBC TV show The Rick Mercer Report. Over 1.1 million viewers tuned in to watch Rick Mercer learn ringette with the Cambridge Turbos.
  • 2009: The 2009 Tim Hortons Canadian Ringette Championships are held in Charlottetown, PEI from April 6-11.
  • 2009: Canada Post issued a set of four stamps celebrating Canada’s sporting inventions, including ringette, basketball, five-pin bowling and lacrosse.
  • 2009: The inaugural U19 World Ringette Championship takes place in Prague, Czech Republic in from August 4-8. The event included two teams from Canada (East and West) and two teams from Finland (White and Blue). Finland Blue captured the world junior ringette title after defeating Canada East in the final.
  • 2009: The National Ringette League enters its sixth season with 18 teams playing in two conferences across Canada – a Western Conference with six teams and an Eastern Conference with twelve teams.

 

Provincial Associations